Let’s face it. The end of a marriage is filled with many battles and fights. When couples in Texas and elsewhere decide to dissolve their union, they are likely prepared to deal with additional arguments and drawn out disputes. This is true if the divorcing couple cannot agree on who leave the marriage with what. Property division is a difficult divorce phase to work through, and without the aid of a prenuptial or postnuptial agreement, it can take some time to arrive at a fair or comparable agreement.

It is not uncommon for divorcing couples to encounter disagreements during property distribution. It might seem almost impossible to get through; however, there are ways to make this process easier on both parties. If it is clear that an agreement cannot be reached, it might be resourceful and valuable to consider mediation. A mediator can help the couples work through their issues, understand where each spouse is coming from and arrive at an amicable agreement.

While it might seem worth it at the time, it is important to not fight about the small stuff. Although it is possible to have emotional attachments to certain items, when it comes down to it, these attachments are not evidence for a judge that one spouse deserves a marital property over the other. However, when a couple is able to work together, they could compromise and factor in these emotional attachments.

Finally, divorcing couples should take the time to familiarize themselves with the laws in their state. Not all states handle property division the same, and in states like Texas, which is a community property state, this information comes in handy when attempting to arrive at an agreement.

If you are dealing with property division disputes or any other divorce law issues, it is important to understand how best to resolve these problems. Divorce can be messy; however, if you take the time to arm yourself with legal representation, it is possible to arrive at a favorable outcome.

Source: Liveabout.com, “3 Tips For Dividing Marital Property During Divorce,” Cathy Meyer, July 14, 2017